Eric D. Green

Dr. Eric Green is the Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) at the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH). He is the third NHGRI Director, having been appointed by NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins in 2009.

Dr. Green has been at the Institute for more than 25 years, during which he has had multiple key leadership roles. He served as the Institute’s Scientific Director for 7 years, Chief of the NHGRI Genome Technology Branch for 13 years, and Founding Director of the NIH Intramural Sequencing Center for 12 years.

For just over two decades, Dr. Green directed an independent research program that included integral start-to-finish roles in the Human Genome Project and groundbreaking work on mapping, sequencing, and characterizing mammalian genomes.

Dr. Green earned his M.D. and Ph.D. degrees in 1987 from Washington University in St. Louis; coincidentally, the word “genomics” was coined in that same year.

During his career, Dr. Green has authored and co-authored over 375 scientific publications.

Stephen F. Kingsmore

Stephen F. Kingsmore is President/CEO of the Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine, San Diego, which is implementing pediatric genomic medicine on an unprecedented scale. Previously he was the Dee Lyons/Missouri Endowed Chair in Genomic Medicine at the Univ. of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine and Director of the Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine at Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City. He has been the President/CEO of the National Center for Genome Resources, Santa Fe, New Mexico, Chief Operating Officer of Molecular Staging Inc., Vice President of Research at CuraGen Corporation, founder of GatorGen, and Assistant Professor at the University of Florida’s School of Medicine. Dr. Kingsmore received MB ChB BAO and DSc degrees from the Queen’s University of Belfast. He trained in clinical immunology in Northern Ireland and did residency in internal medicine and fellowship at Duke University Medical Center. He is a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists. He was a MedScape Physician of the year in 2012, and received the 2013 Scripps Genomic Medicine award and 2013 ILCHUN prize of the Korean Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. TIME magazine ranked his rapid genome diagnosis one of the top 10 medical breakthroughs of 2012.

Euan Ashley

Born in Scotland, Ashley graduated with 1st class Honors in Physiology and Medicine from the University of Glasgow. He completed medical residency and a PhD at the University of Oxford before moving to Stanford University where he trained in cardiology and advanced heart failure, joining the faculty in 2006. His group is focused on the science of precision medicine. In 2010, he led the team that carried out the first clinical interpretation of a human genome. The article became one of the most cited in clinical medicine that year and was later featured in the Genome Exhibition at the Smithsonian in DC. Over the following 3 years, the team extended the approach to the first whole genome molecular autopsy, to a family of four, and to a case series of patients in primary care.

Howard McLeod

Dr Howard McLeod is an internationally recognized expert in precision medicine, having made novel contributions at the discovery, translation, implementation, and policy levels.  He is the Medical Director for Precision Medicine at the Geriatric Oncology Consortium and a Professor at the University of South Florida Taneja College of Pharmacy.  Howard received a BSPharm from University of Washington and a PharmD from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy & Science.  He completed clinical pharmacology fellowship training at St Jude Children’s Research Hospital and then the Beatson Institute, University of Glasgow.  Dr McLeod has been a tenured full Professor since 2002.  Dr McLeod chaired the NHGRI eMERGE network external scientific panel for the past decade and was a recent member of both the FDA committee on Clinical Pharmacology and the NIH Human Genome Advisory Council.  Dr McLeod has been recognized as a Fellow of both the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy and was recently ranked #1 USA/#2 World for Pharmacogenomics.  He has also been an active Board Member and/or Founder for over a dozen privately held and publicly traded companies.  Howard has published over 575 peer reviewed papers on pharmacogenomics, applied therapeutics, or clinical pharmacology and continues to work to advance innovative healthcare.

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Gretchen Bandoli

I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at UC San Diego. My research interests include pregnancy and early childhood determinants of health. I also am interested in the expansion of methodology to characterize complex exposures across gestation, including substances (alcohol, marijuana) and medications. I am a co-investigator of the Study of Mothers and Infants, a large administrative database linked to biospecimens allowing us to study genetic and environmental contributors to pregnancy and child outcomes.

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Diana W. Bianchi

Diana W. Bianchi is the Director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and a Senior Investigator in the Center for Precision Health Research at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). She received her M.D. from Stanford and her postgraduate training in Pediatrics, Medical Genetics and Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine at Harvard.

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Phil Febbo

Phil Febbo, MD, was appointed as Chief Medical Officer in March 2018. In this role, he is responsible for developing and executing the Company’s medical strategy to drive genomic testing into healthcare practice. Febbo has a successful track record of translational research, clinical excellence, and for embedding molecular insights into clinical care. 

Kelly Frazer

Dr. Frazer is an internationally renowned leader in the field of genome biology. She is the director of UC San Diego Institute for Genomic Medicine and is a professor and founding chief of the Division of Genome Information Sciences in the Department of Pediatrics at UC San Diego. Over the past seven years, Dr. Frazer’s lab has systematically derived and characterized a unique collection of iPSC lines from 222 individuals – referred to as iPSCORE (iPSC Collection for Omic Research). The iPSCORE resource is currently being used to conduct genotype – molecular phenotype correlations in both pluripotent stem cells and iPSC-derived cell types.

Niall J Lennon

Niall J Lennon, Ph.D. is the Senior Director of Translational Genomics at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, where he is also an Institute Scientist. He is also the Chief Scientific Officer and Chair of the Board of Managers of CRSP LLC, Broad’s clinical testing laboratory. Dr. Lennon is also an Associate Director of the Gerstner Center for Cancer Diagnostics. He oversees the development, implementation, and validation of disruptive technologies to serve basic research, clinical research, and clinical diagnostics.

Len Pennacchio

Dr. Len Pennacchio is a Senior Scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Deputy Director of the DOE Joint Genome Institute, and Adjunct Professor at the University of California Berkeley.  He received his PhD in Genetics from Stanford University in 1998 under Rick Myers and then served as a DOE Alexander Hollaender Distinguished Fellow at LBL under Eddy Rubin. He has authored over 150 publications and received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from the White House for his contributions to the Human Genome Project and understanding mammalian gene regulation in vivo. Dr. Pennacchio has an extensive background in mammalian genetics and genomics as well as with DNA sequencing technologies and their application to address outstanding issues in both the biomedical, energy, and environment sectors. He serves in numerous advisory roles such as NHGRI’s Genome Sequencing Program, the Centre for Genomic Research at the University of Liverpool, as a past permanent member of NIH’s GCAT Study Section. He also is an Organizer and Co-Chair of both annual Advances in Genome Biology & Technology (AGBT) meetings as well as a “Systems Biology of Gene Regulation and Genome Editing” meeting hosted by Cold Spring Harbor Asia. Currently his research is heavily focused on understanding the spectrum of DNA mutations that contribute to human disease through in vivo functional studies.