Precision Medicine Innovators to Speak at Inaugural AGBT-Precision Health Conference

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Leisa Zigman, President, AGBT leisaz@agbt.org or 314-615-6360 Precision Medicine Innovators to Speak at Inaugural AGBT-Precision Health Conference Three-day Scottsdale Meeting Features Leaders from Academia and Industry St. Louis, MO (July 19, 2016) – Remarkable strides in precision medicine applications are addressing the ever-growing human need for new breakthroughs in precision diagnostics and treatments for mankind’s most challenging diseases. A new conference will highlight progress at the confluence of genomics, medicine, and health: AGBT-Precision Health. The AGBT-Precision Health conference builds upon the successful model defined by the annual Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) meeting, recognized worldwide as the leading genomic technology research conference. Held in Scottsdale, Arizona, from September 22 to 24, AGBT-Precision Health unites the world’s leading clinical translation professionals for three days of keynote talks and industry insights. “In organizing AGBT-Precision Health, we sought to emphasize the current trends in clinical translation of next-generation sequencing, permitting attendees to get a sense of the cutting-edge applications and analytical combinations that are changing the clinical reality for patients across the spectrum of diagnosis and disease treatment,” commented Elaine Mardis, PhD, who co-chairs the organizing committee for AGBT-Precision Health. The agenda features presentations by many practitioners and technologists in precision health, including: Diana Bianchi, Tufts Medical Center Stephen Kingsmore, Rady Children’s Hospital Heidi Rehm, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School Richard Daly, DNAnexus William Gahl, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health Mia Levy, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Amy McGuire, Baylor College of Medicine Nickolas Papadopoulos, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Kenna Mills Shaw, MD Anderson Cancer Center Alan Shuldiner, Regeneron Genetics Center...

AGBT 2017 LOCATION AND DATES ANNOUNCED

April 27, 2016 To the AGBT Family: Within the past few weeks, representatives of the Marco Marriott Hotel informed us that construction is 3 months behind schedule and they would not be able to host our conference in 2017. We have now learned construction is 6 months behind schedule. Our team quickly went to work to ensure you would have a beach (we heard you loud and clear in our survey). With just ten months out, it was difficult to find a place in Florida, in February, at the height of season, while competing with the other displaced Marco Marriott conferences.   However, we are excited to share our new home with you for 2017. In addition to the outstanding science, you’ll be enjoying the fabulous beaches of South Florida at the iconic Diplomat Resort! General Manager Ed Walls and his entire staff can’t wait to welcome you to their legendary ocean front property, (Minutes from both Ft. Lauderdale and Miami airports).    Check out the link and save the date! AGBT17 will be held February 13- 16, 2017. http://www.diplomatresort.com/default-en.html We can’t wait to see you...

AGBT Day 2: Jay Flatley, Anne Wojcicki

Frida, February 12, 2016 James Hadfield-AGBT Guest Blogger (The CRUK Cambridge Institute Genomics Core) Todays plenary is pretty exciting with two people speaking who have had a massive impact on Genomics, but from outside the academic circle: Jay Flately and Anne Wojcicki. Jay Flatley needs no introduction to the AGBT audience; his driving force in Illumina is one part of what got us to where we are today. His talk titled “Beyond the $1000 Genome – What’s next for NGS?” probably did not give attendees much hope of finding out about much that was new, however Jay delivered in spades. He started by describing some of the key ingredients he thought had driven Illumina, and gave us a brief history of key developments in the Illumina NGS family. 2007 Genome Anlayser; 2010 line scan imaging (HiSeq 2000); 2011 LED optics and Basespace (MiSeq); 2012 rapid run mode, faster fluidics and scanning (HiSeq 2500); patterned flowcells (HiSeq X); 2014 2 colour SBS, dry flowcells and consumer optics (NextSeq). The exciting bit of the talk was Jay’s very open description of Project Firefly, which he said may not be available till Christmas 2017! This is built out of the Avantome CMOS technology that Illumina stopped developing due to the requirement for emulsion PCRand. Jay showed “the sequencer that was built but never sold”! However Illumina has now implemented SBS on a CMOS to create a one-colour SBS semiconductor sequencer. The system also includes an integrated digital fluidic library prep using the NeoPrep fluidics (not sure whether this is a good thing or not). Firefly Specs: Raw read accuracy of 99% is...

AGBT 16 Clinical Applications

Advances in genomic clinical applications: Genomic medicine will occur when research becomes translated into clinical and reduced to practice. AGBT Guest Blogger: Dale Yuzuki (SeraCare Life Sciences, Inc.) Friday, 2/12/16 From the NHGRI 2011 strategic plan “Charting a course for genomic medicine from base pairs to bedside” < http://www.genome.gov/SP2011/ > Years ago Eric Green, the Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute (and one of the two organizers of the Advances in Genome Biology and Technology conference) would often talk about the need to make the knowledge of the human genome and the advances in sequencing technologies ‘reduced to practice’. In 2011 he and Mark Guyer published a strategic plan in the journal Nature, called ‘Charting a course for genomic medicine from base pairs to bedside’. < http://www.genome.gov/SP2011/ > This was the culmination of a two-year effort, and this plan was published in coordination with a public symposium held on the NIH campus, which I was able to attend. Now through the magic of the interwebs, you can see what the genomic community thought in 2011 as their presentations have been made available here. < http://www.genome.gov/27542740 > Eric Lander of the Broad Institute, Sean Eddy of HHMI, Rick Lifton of Yale, Maynard Olson of University of Washington, they all share their perspective of the past and the chart of the future in their talks. (Hint: if you want to save some time, not only have the video been made available but also their slides, and then you can go back to the video if so desired.) Anyway, the concept of ‘reduce to practice’ and the phrase ‘from base-pairs...

AGBT 16 Day 2

From the Depths of Disease to the Depths of Space AGBT Guest Blogger: Meredith Salisbury(Bioscribe) February 12, 2016   By Friday afternoon here at AGBT, attendees were starting to show signs of wear from the all- night parties, but they rallied for a plenary session featuring a couple of genomics veterans and a project about sequencing in outer space. Cancer research luminary Harold Varmus started things off with a talk on precision medicine and its implications for understanding carcinogenesis. He began with a look at oncogenic mutations that seem to be mutually exclusive, such as EGFR and KRAS, which are the most frequently mutated oncogenes in lung adenocarcinoma but have never been observed in the same tumor. Using transgenic mice, his team showed that inducing expression of one oncogene in the presence of the other causes cell death, leading to the intriguing if uneasy possibility of using an oncogene as a potential therapeutic. In other work, Varmus’s lab is investigating mutation frequency in splicing factor genes, which may be related to carcinogenesis. They’re now using CRISPR/Cas9 experiments to determine why such high mutational frequency is seen in cancer cells. If attendees needed a dose of adrenaline to power through the day, they got it in the form of Chris Mason’s breakneck-pace presentation about an integrative ’omic study of twin astronauts he’s doing for NASA. The two-year-long study measures virtually everything that can be measured, from proteomics to DNA mutations to methylation patterns and telomere lengths and more, in both twins for the year while one is at the International Space Station and the other is earthbound, plus six months before...